May 2008

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Comments

Tim

In the UK we call sneakers trainers and cell phones are mobile phones. Neither word looks like becoming old fashioned.

I like old fashioned words, I read a lot of early 20th century literature including Orwell and Steinbeck, I love orwells spelling of Connexion, I would use it myself but people just correct me.

sey

tennis shoes r stupid.

sneakers ftw.

and yes i fear a paperless society (because it means everything u write can be watched)

gordon_goosemonster

Man?

Caitlin

It also depends on where you are. For instance, we call 'cell phone's, 'mobile's, and 'sneakers' or 'tennis shoes' are 'runners'. For running in. Though I have never heard anyone use the phrase 'tennis shoes'. I think 'sneakers' is more right.

brian

'Snekers' is a funny term... when I was young (about 20 years ago we called them 'Runners' cos that's what you did as a kid, run everywhere. That was in Ireland.

In the UK though they call them 'Trainers' cos people, I guess, train in them.

However, in Northern Ireland they call them 'Gutties'... I have no frickin idea what that's all about...!

Kane

Cell Phone (which should be "Mobile Phone")
Fender (which should be "Bumper")
Sidewalk (which should be "Pavement")

...or any other of the variety of changes you guys have made to the ENGLISH language...... :o)

aine

How about 'Shipping' a parcel, even when its travelling by road or air-mail?

In the southwest of the UK, Plimsolls are called 'daps'.

Ben

It's funny because other things will have to be split into more definitions e.g. day job and night job for when you have to work two or even three jobs to pay the bastard rent on a studio flat!

Siddharth Ravichandran

Some widely abused words such as

-Strategy
-The Big Picture
-Win-win

They are used anywhere and everywhere losing their real meaning.

Xena

What is wrong with the term sneakers.

I don't like saying tennis shoes.

What is wrong with people of today. Geez.

William Skyvington

It was Scott himself who injected fuzziness into this theme by evoking first a WORD (sneakers) that might be obsolete, and then a THING (library) that might soon be superseded. How can you expect us pupils to be rigorous when the master himself reasons in a sloppy fashion?

Edmond Hui

'Syndicated comic strips'? Soon you'll only be able to read them online. I can't remember the lat time I read Dilbert in a newspaper.

Andy

I'm from the UK so let me explain.

Trainers = Training shoes. How on earth does that make anyone think of bras?

Workerant

In the UK, sneakers were called 'pumps' (no idea why, they didn't pump anything) or 'gym shoes'. Now I understand that this is really old and I must call them 'trainers'.
Anyway, I must go and use my record player to play my LP collection whilst winding my watch.

RustyBadger

To wacky bob:

Here's a couple more anachronistic words for you to reintroduce:

Quim - the *ahem* external bits of the female human reproductive organs

Merkin - a wig designed for the above, often available in contrasting colours to the wearer's natural hair

Of all the discarded words in the English language, I enjoy throwing those two into casual conversation the most.

Delphi

Virtual sex. It will be simply Sex.
Artificial Insemination. Will be only insemination.

Christian

HANDSHAKE

Person

I'd like to echo David Kimball. It bothers me to refer to it as a paycheck, when it's only the dorks who don't sign up for direct deposit. And there's no "stub" for the pay stub. It just aggravates me how people think their pay has to come as a check. Likewise, when they refer to pension payments as "that check coming in the mail every month". I thought the benefit was the money, not the check.

I'd prefer people say "pay" or "wage" or "salary" or even "labor income" rather than "paycheck". I'd also prefer "pay record" or "pay receipt" instead of "pay stub" even though they're longer, just because it doesn't scream, "HEY, LET'S ACT LIKE IT'S STILL 1950!"

Person

I'd like to echo David Kimball. It bothers me to refer to it as a paycheck, when it's only the dorks who don't sign up for direct deposit. And there's no "stub" for the pay stub. It just aggravates me how people think their pay has to come as a check. Likewise, when they refer to pension payments as "that check coming in the mail every month". I thought the benefit was the money, not the check.

I'd prefer people say "pay" or "wage" or "salary" or even "labor income" rather than "paycheck". I'd also prefer "pay record" or "pay receipt" instead of "pay stub" even though they're longer, just because it doesn't scream, "HEY, LET'S ACT LIKE IT'S STILL 1950!"

Sunil Bajpai

Surface Computer?

Shoaib

Tennis shoes must be a West Coast thing. I still call them sneakers

Red

How about middle class? Ok, that's two words. Stop being small minded.

dontbother

"Old-fashioned" soon to become "old-fashion" or even "oldfashion" for the fashionable who write "alot".

dontbother

"Old-fashioned" soon to become "old-fashion" or even "oldfashion" for the fashionable who write "alot".

Shan

The '-' in e-mail has already vanished. As seen in this comment area.

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