May 2008

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Comments

Cormac

Scott, is it possible that there could be a fourth factor motivating you to blog, that being filantropic motivator:
you bring happiness and reflection and wisdom to thousands of people across the globe every day

i am 19 years old, i read your books growing up as a youn teenager and since its inception have your blog allmost daily.

maybe a fourth factor motivating you is that you throught your blog have a massive impact on peoples lives, your process of critical thinking and system of filtering arguments has gone a long way towards shaping who i am.

Thanks

please keep blogging

Bill Tkach

I don' think I've seen more responses to one of your blogs, ever.

I started reading your blog postings because I read Dilbert, because I thought it would be funny. When I started reading the blogs, however, they were a lot more insightful and strangely, informative than I would have ever expected. And funny, don't forget funny. I find it interesting that the human behind Dilbert isn't as square as his comic would make one believe. Sadly, I honestly assumed you would kinda resemble your character, and had worked in a similar job. Damn.

There is a big difference between what you post in your blogs, where you try to be as open as you can about your beliefs & ideas, and sometimes tread on things that disturb people due to ethnic or patriotic or spiritual reasons, and your Dilbert strip. Some people might be bothered that you are lewd in your blog, but I like it. It's like the "adult" Dilbert. That's why I think it's cool.
Sadly most of the Dilbert comics have gone to vanilla for me. They have no pizazz, or sparkle. They are trying to appeal to to wide of an audience. I used to be really excited about reading them, but now, not so much. I usually will find maybe one comic a week that interests me. Maybe it's because there is so little material presented therein. My point, is, your blog is actually interesting. I want to read it each morning. Your blog is actually the only blog I read each morning. Other than news blogs.

As for the ads you have on your blog, I've been coming here probably for about a year or more, and I don't think, that I've once clicked on an add; except maybe by mistake to try to get back to the main web page. Banner ads are pretty much ineffectual for anyone 40 and under, working in an office. And looking at the ads, they are for Snoopy anyway! Why would I click them while viewing Scott Adams blog? Some dude already mentioned this, and he was right. I'm just reiterating.

Maybe you should create another blog, under a fake name (ie Brent King, Stephen Spiner) and post blogs there, so they don't negatively affect your Dilbert strip. We won't tell anyone it's you. Plus if your using a alias, you can have different types of ads, that might draw more revenue. As opposed to just ads that try to sell vanilla Dilbert.

All I'm saying is, I like your blog.

john75half

I'm a latecomer to this blog - I only started reading a month or two ago. But I've really enjoyed it (and, incidentally, I bought your book for a family member for Christmas). I'll look forward to whatever posts you have time for. I appreciate anyone who provides me with free entertainment like this.

Andrew

Does this mean no more posts about free will, or the lack thereof? And to think, you almost had me convinced. In fact, I think the only reason I'm not convinced we're just moist robots is that I choose to believe in free will. :p

But I do have to wonder, of all the people who say they'll never read Dilbert again because of a post, how many actually follow through with the threat? Of those, how many stick with it for a significant length of time? Is that number a significant number compare to your entire readership?

Surely, every year there are people who discover Dilbert and become faithful readers. I suspect that number is much larger than the number of people who actually stop reading Dilbert due to a blog post. But I can't prove it.

But I do admire your bravery and chuzpah to blog on topics that will likely land you in hot-water with some.

One also has to wonder how many people would read this blog if they're not Dilbert readers to begin with? Only a certain percentage of Dilbert readers know the name of his creator. (That's why you're known as "the Dilbert guy".) Of the non-Dilbert-reading population, only a very small portion would know who you are. ("Yeah, I know who Scott Adams is, but what's this Dilbert thing? A brand of pickles?") So, trying to get more Dilbert readers by way of this blog seems kind of backwards to me. But I can't prove it.

Andrew

Does this mean no more posts about free will, or the lack thereof? And to think, you almost had me convinced. In fact, I think the only reason I'm not convinced we're just moist robots is that I choose to believe in free will. :p

But I do have to wonder, of all the people who say they'll never read Dilbert again because of a post, how many actually follow through with the threat? Of those, how many stick with it for a significant length of time? Is that number a significant number compare to your entire readership?

Surely, every year there are people who discover Dilbert and become faithful readers. I suspect that number is much larger than the number of people who actually stop reading Dilbert due to a blog post. But I can't prove it.

But I do admire your bravery and chuzpah to blog on topics that will likely land you in hot-water with some.

One also has to wonder how many people would read this blog if they're not Dilbert readers to begin with? Only a certain percentage of Dilbert readers know the name of his creator. (That's why you're known as "the Dilbert guy".) Of the non-Dilbert-reading population, only a very small portion would know who you are. ("Yeah, I know who Scott Adams is, but what's this Dilbert thing? A brand of pickles?") So, trying to get more Dilbert readers by way of this blog seems kind of backwards to me.

JP

Scott,

Barry Ritholtz at Big Picture (a sharp financial blogger) has some comments on this post...maybe someone already brought this to your attention but here it is anyway...

http://bigpicture.typepad.com/

David

Let's see. We just built a database of books we own. Scott Adams is in the top 5 of authors by # of volumes.

Every year, I know what one of my Christmas gifts will be: a 365-day calendar full of...

...Dilbert strips that I have already read. I pay unitedmedia,com to email one to me every day (I haven't taken a dead-tree news organ since 1998).

And you don't have enough of my money yet? So now I have to click through my Google reader to read the whole thing?

I could infer from what you wrote here that it would somehow work better for you if I unsub'ed entirely than if I continue as I am doing now... reading the posts in Firefox with AdBlock-Plus fully engaged. Is that about right?

Please advise because at this point I could go either way.

Matt

Hi Scott. I love your work. Do what you need to do man! You can always scratch a blogging itch by posting anonymously somewhere. See you around.

Jeff

Well regardless of the many comments on here that don't have a positive thing to say, I really enjoy the blog posts and they make me more interested in Dilbert things. I often tell other people about your blogs and refer them to the site as well. I would be disappointed if you decided not to do this very often anymore.

FigJam

I never read your blog very often anyway, so I really don't care. But your whining about blogging "reducing your income" struck me as over the top. I'd wager that your income from the Dilbert franchise is already substantial enough that you don't need to worry about that next mortgage payment!

Russ

wah wah, who let the cry baby out. You provide a marginal service to a small segment of the overall population. Lucky for you there is a huge cultural and economic machine already in place to make, distribute and collect revenue from your "services".

Shut up and entertain us.

P.S. Did you create an avenue for this attitude in me or was it already there?

tmac

I use Internet Explorer, there are no ads with this browser either. When are you going to reveal that this is a great a thought experiment that mirrors a local band trying to make it big on the net?
Happy Holidays,
-T

Unsympathetic

" Every blog post reduced my income "

Scott, you're looking at the economics of this wholly incorrectly. Blog posts can only INCREASE your income.

What kind of solipsistic cretin leaves any person or place or website because they discovered one little thing they don't like? People can find some piece to dislike in EVERYTHING. The question always is.. are those pieces more powerful than what they actually enjoy?

For god's sake, people who leave your blog or write terrible comments... NEVER LIKED YOU TO BEGIN WITH. Nothing you could do to keep them around or swing them to your side - not one thing. Think of it like a bad date.


Or, since we're all engidorks around here.. think of satisfying your audience like curve-fitting. In a very simplistic analogy, a regression fit includes a "true" model and its error to obtain sampled points. Curve-fitting worries more about capturing the underlying model and defining parameters for error than trying to enclose 100% of everything.


Find your inner alpha, scott - you can do it. Why do you care about people who don't care about you?

NW

Heh, I seriously thought you weren't doing it for the money, I thought there is some sort of financial level which when reached makes money relevant only for spending and transforming into happiness.

I feel so naive.

Live and learn I guess...

Sian

I love the blog. It gives shape and meaning to my gray windowless office confined day.

I come here every day whether I agree with you or not.

djeikyb

I use an RSS reader partly to eliminate annoying graphical ads, but mostly for viewing convenience. I can keep up with the news I want in a single download, without the hassle of browsing the web on a 2kB/s connection. It's also a must not to be dependant on a blogger's aesthetics; though your blog is well enough designed. You'll definitely lose (some) readers by only feeding teasers.

Martijn

Scott,

I understand your decision. The selfish part of me regrets not being able to read your daily blog anymore. The more wise part of me understands. I will miss it though.

Kind regards,
Martijn

Rob

firstly - thank you for the thoughtful and thought provoking comments over the years.

secondly - why not try to get paid for blogging. I'd suggest the following.

1) add a signature to the bottom of the RSS feed with something like the following:

"I write these posts partly for fun, and partly for money. If you enjoy reading them, then click here to make a contribution of $15 (about the price of one of my books). I promise to write a new post for each squirrel-full of cash that I get. If I don't get enough donations, then I will not release many new posts"

you should probably keep as a secret just how mych a squirrel-full is. I would trust you to play honestly.

and of course - you can still post freebies and mark them as such.

you would get something like 90/95% of the donations compared to a <10% (?) on books - so that may compensate for the fact that there will be plenty of freeloaders.

if you want to get all fancy, you could give full rss feeds to the folks who donate and keep abbreviated feeds for those who don't.

I'll happily make the first contribution.

Greg Wischnewsky

Hi Scott,
even if you don't use RSS feeds (which you can easily kill), people can and will use adblockers for their browsers - as do I because, surprise, surprise, most of us think that ads are a useless waste of time and bothersome at best.
I will not stop reading Dilbert or your blog because both have been too much fun over the years and have given me too many enjoyable intellectual challenges to stop now. Probably I'm hooked. But I want to say that you just sank a couple of notches on my personal esteem scale. Call me naive, that's all right, but I really thought you were doing this just to have an unfiltered dialogue with your readers, to find out how your audience ticks and what makes them tick. Bummer that I obviously was wrong there too.
Sometimes altruism is just not a bad thing.

Regards, Greg

Boris

Interesting point about the add revenue. I go straight to the blog page, which presumably generates a hit which gets you a little more money. Fine with me.

However, I'm really good at not noticing the advertising on a page, even if it's some big flashing, annoying banner. I suppose that, in theory, it's affecting me subliminally, but that's just a theory, and I don't really believe it. I suspect that a lot of other people get this way after using the Internet for a while.

So it's kind of funny to me that anybody would pay you money on the assumption that they'll get more business from people visiting your web page. It's even funnier that they might be right.

Satu

Hi Scott,

Thank You for the blogs so far! I keep finding them very helpful. Either they make me laugh, which is a great help for many things, or they make me think, which is sometimes even better than the laughs. More often than not, they make me both laugh and think. At times, your texts just make me feel happy for a moment, help me to find the courage to believe in the good in people.

I have admired your generosity writing the blogs every day. I understand your reasons not to wish to do so in the future.

Any future postings will be greatly appreciated. And yes, looking forward to keeping reading Dilbert, too. And promise to buy the latest book as soon as it hits Europe. :)

Joshua Ziemann

Your economists senses should be tingling! Perhaps one of these is a better business model for achieving your four goals:

1. Instead of the blogging free-for-all, send out a daily private email to a listserv of subscribers who would be willing to pay a nominal fee every month. I know I would only pay a few dollars a month to be confused and/or insulted every day. Raise it above this threshold to retain only those who are loyal to you!

2. Found an online university for inspired thinkers. I would attend it. You think I'm joking...

3. Run for president....think about it: who needs direct advertising revenue when every fighter jet stationed in the Middle East is emblazoned with the visage of Dogbert? What could be more artistically satisfying? Fear would keep the readers in line.

Andrew

Scott,

I have to say that while I don't post very often, I read this [heh heh] 'religiously' almost every day, and like others have found your posts thought-provoking and highly entertaining. I've forwarded blog URLs to pretty much every thinking person [not all the people I know really think] I'm friendly with at some point, especially when you have either one of your more controversial posts or one that's laugh-out-loud/ snork-in-your-coffee funny... you can imagine my flurry of activity when you have a controversial AND funny post! Anyway, I have found your blog to be directly responsible for purchases of your Dilbert books ["oh yah, this smart guy does Dilbert too!" Ka-ching!] and 'Gods Debris' is sitting on my laptop because I couldn't get enough with the daily posts. Oh, and I know of at least two others that now subscribe to your Dilbert mailing list as a result of my email 'hey check this out!' carpet bombing.

Thanks for sharing!

Kevin Carson

I was pissed by your post on copyright several months ago--more for what I thought was your arrogant attitude towards those who disagreed than for your actual opinion--but I still enjoy reading Dilbert every day.

Grady

Hi Scott,

you started blogging on 25 October 2005. My research indicates that you have posted 768 entries in 764 days. That's a great effort - but apparently you never really got in to blogging!

http://www.ducttapemarketing.com/blog/2007/11/27/are-blogs-losing-steam-for-some/

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