May 2008

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
        1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31

« Halfothesis | Main | Uncool Labels »

Comments

Just Me

Company T-shirts (and ones from Walkathons, clean-up-the-riverbanks days, whatever, are only fit for cutting up into paint rags and strips for staking tomatoes.

I can always use more paint rags and tomato tie-ups, so if you have some for free, send them over.

They're great for polishing the car too.

I think there may be a profitable sideline in charging big $$ to the families and friends of your customers, to ban their credit cards from your site. Sort of fashion intervention marketing.

Now, underpants with hated brand names printed across the butt - there's a possibility.

Jill

No way!

Eva

Do all these people actually wear T-shirts?? I mean, at a certain age I think you should stop wearing T-shirts and start using shirts... maybe that's just me...

Shawn Dream

I agree with everyone who said most of the magic is getting it for FREE. That doesn't mean the idea is valueless, just that you would want to try and reshuffle the money flow.

I think the best idea would be a convention with some sort of draw (you could do a Dilbert themed one), and let people scan their ticket stubs to get merch. Sell booths to companies on the grounds that they have to offer free merch one to a ticket, and let the free market handle it from there.

You get paid by companies, companies get ad booths and to distribute their merch, and people get free stuff (although they paid to get in to the convention), and they can choose which stuff they want to wear.

Logistics of carrying the loot in and out would reduce the influence of people trying to resell massive quantities, and you could help companies by lining up scanners that would report if a ticket had been used before at their booth. (Although that part might not matter as much - if someone REALLY wants multiple shirts from one company they probably have a good home in mind for them). You could also help small companies line up merch makers.

Might be useful for your publicity/marketing team.

Kurt

Yes

Arby

With me it’s an issue of good corporate governance. If the logo is from a large corporation that is doing good for its stockholders, the community and the country’s economy fine. If they are greedy sleaze bags with an overpaid, underperforming CEOs that rip off its stake holders and pollute the planet I pass. Just because they are big doesn’t mean they are good.

There are lots of other causes, companies, groups and institutions that do much for the country and the people that should have their name displayed and promoted.

Hey, we are talking almost free underwear here so maybe it doesn’t matter that much but just a thought behind the entity being showcased might be relevant. Not a funny post but neither is exploiting foreign workers to peddle cheaper goods at discount stores here.

Jose

Are you kidding? My wife and I still have 65+ vendor tees from our time working in computer sales in 1998.

Somewhat cynical thought - set up a clearinghouse for companies to submit their designs. They then pay to make and ship x-hundred tshirts to homeless and womens' shelters. Tax writeoff + charity + advertising.

simon

I know your leaving off the controversial stuff Scott, but this is too good to ignore

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,,2222623,00.html

Rack

No. Also I wouldn't subsidise someone's shirt if it came as part of a 12-pack.

Alex

Yes. But of course I'd be very specific about what companies.
I'll think of some examples, because that's my idea of fun. I'd like a BBC logo, or some beer brands (la Vieille Salme, most Trappists, Guinness - wait, I used to have a Guinness shirt. More than $5, I can tell you), Benson & Hedges, Lucky Strike, ...
Wait, maybe I'm confusing companies with their brands, here. I'd like shirts with most of my favorite alcohol, tobacco and firearms products on 'em, but not necessarily the faceless multinational conglomerate behind them.

Fábio

Well, isn't it what we do when wearing brand cloathes?

Hacker Kitty

I'd pay a ridiculous amount for a t-shirt with the "Blue Sun" logo on it... Does it count if the evil corporation you want to advertise is fictional?

Simon

The vision and ability to sell twelve $5 shirts for $70 is what separates rich men from the rest of us.

E

My theory is that men actually wear these t-shirts with company logo's on them because they're free, and because they get given to them randomly (as opposed to having to go out shopping for them). So no, I doubt you'd make a killing trying to sell them.

Klaus Kaan

no ... NO!

But don't mind me. I'm a loon that doesn't even watch television anymore.

Jeet

Some of my friends at fingerprints.in are doing it too :-)

Greg Wischnewsky

Nope, I wouldn't.
I abhor Marketing as such by principle. The only occasion when i wear branded T-Shirts is when I wear them under a shirt or a pullover. Should I have to advertise for a company, no matter which, this company would have to pay me, not the other way around.

Cheers.

Roland

You're right. At my last (IT) job, the free T-shirts we got from suppliers were usually better quality, better fitting and more comfortable than the unbranded T-shirts I owned for leisure use. And the branding was often pretty cool, too.

Since leaving that company, I have started to wear the branded shirts at home instead of my own t-shirts...

Cristen

Rewboss: you're describing a different transaction, i.e. a long-term guaranteed sponsorship deal, and sadly for you, that's worth a good million dollars or so with any high-profile figure.

As for the business idea, I don't know about the US, but it wouldn't work here in England due to the fact that we have stores such as Primark selling comfortable, nicely designed T-shirts for a few pounds a pop, without company branding.

ArunS

i hv got a feeling that companies wud then insist on making t-shirts for nice-bodied ppl ONLY.

If i had a company, i wud like 2 put my logo on bikinis & not t-shrist

paulipe

No I wouldn't. I wear company t-shirts when MY company gives them to me, or if a family member happens to have one and is in the marketing department or so. I'd hate to have someone ask me about the company and to actually say I bought it off the net. There is a pride in the symbolism of a company t-shirt. You are endorsing it after all.

What Would Deep Throat Do?

Why? Whenever I see people walking around with their Nike logo'd crap I have to wonder what happened to their own identity and why they don't use it instead.

Also, I think corporate marketers must get a real chuckle whenever they sell clothing with their logo on it. I mean, good grief, idiots are paying THEM to advertise their product.

Silvox

The brand could be a value add/marketing/promises from the supply side towards customers, it really depands if the cool logo shirt meet my demands for it could be that I need that shirt or I want that shirt depends on my usage or application. Goods mix tools, hmmm nice.

Raj

yes I would. In fact it would be nice to have a dilbert T shirt! (are they already in the market?)

Kes

If I could browse through them and choose ones that I found cool - yes. But I wouldn't want to buy 12 at a time. And I'd need a skinny fit S. And you don't ship to Germany anyway :-(

The comments to this entry are closed.